Fiche de révision de vocabulaire d'anglais - Bad News For Students - Cours - Fiches de révision

Type de doc : Cours - Fiches de révision  |  Matière : Anglais   |  Niveau d'études : 1ère ES voirVoir tous les autres documents en 1ère ES Anglais

Leçon 16 : Bad News For Students

Enrichissez votre vocabulaire d’anglais en passant votre souris sur les mots soulignés pour en avoir la traduction.

Résumé en français : La Crise pousse les étudiants anglais à changer leur comportement face aux études.

The recession has created another victim it seems - students fresh out of University, looking for a job. Because of massive job cuts , fresh graduates are finding it harder to find jobs out of University than ever before. This creates a knock-on effect altering the flow of students entering University and those leaving. As a result, in the UK for example, 25% more students are staying on to study more, instead of entering the job market , while more incoming students than ever are postponing their studies to try and find work directly out of high school.
These traits are very worrying . To begin with, more first-time job seekers without a university education will certainly increase the need for benefits , for young people as there are fewer jobs across all sectors now.
Therefore, there will be less qualified people looking for work and more qualified people shying away from work. In addition, most graduate trainee job schemes , such as those funded through the Press Association, have been cut, greatly hindering the options graduates have for first jobs. In this case, most newspapers take on trainee journalists, a coveted position that usually ends up in a job with the title. Unfortunately , like most companies right now, newspapers and media companies are cutting jobs, and the first to go are the ones that begin with training , rather than results. The same cases are seen across all sectors, from automobile construction to investment banking.
This engenders a few interesting questions facing both those looking towards University and those stuck within its pedagogical walls. Firstly, is starting to study for a degree in higher education worth it , if it does not increase one's chances of finding a job afterward? Secondly, does it make sense financially to go on benefits and try finding work, or rather stay in school and live on student loans ? Tuition fees are expected to rise across the EU (the countries without public funded Universities of course), adding another difficulty to the mix. Therefore, it's expensive to be in school or not be in school. Still, those surveyed through UK government recruitment agency High Fliers discovered 97% of all students enjoy being in school, despite all the headaches awaiting them. Still, the end result of these findings proves that the overarching feeling around being a student now is ' gloomy and uncertain'. And if one does not go at all, it could be even gloomier. Maybe that says it all.

By Shain