1. Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°18 : Mrs Gao - And The Hidden Truth Of AIDS In China

Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°18 : Mrs Gao - And The Hidden Truth Of AIDS In China

Envoyer cet article à un ami
Sommaire du dossier
Retour au dossier Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°42 : Where is Haiti now? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°41 : The music business - Profit or loss ? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°40 : Rapper Jay-Z releases new book Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°39 : Student Protest Divides Nation Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°38 : Nick Leeson - UK’s Jerome Kerviel Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°37 : A British view of the French education system Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°36 : Fertility tourism Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°35 : The Graduates' Difficulties Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°34 : Why the English need to learn another language Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°33 : Historical fiction Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°32 : What’s Eating India? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°31 : UK, Retirement Age To Rise To 66 Years Old Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°30 : Who Wants To Be A Teacher? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°29 : Working for humanitarian organisations Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°28 : Lads’ Mags Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°27 : Should Politics Serve The Markets Or Tame Them? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°26 : When will I be famous? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°25 : Compensatory Ethics Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°24 : How to choose an MBA school... Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°23 : Bamboccioni - The Italian Word for a Global Trend Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°22 : China is in first place to make clean energy Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°21 : MBAs – is the class diverse enough ? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°20 : UK And France Call For Anonymous CV’s Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°19 : Alcohol, the worst drug ? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°18 : Mrs Gao - And The Hidden Truth Of AIDS In China Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°17 : Hungry World Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°16 : Flash Mobbing Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°15 : “Twitter Is Useless” Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°14 : Gap Years Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°13 : Expatriates, is the grass really greener on the other side? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°12 : Reality TV Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°11 : Bad News For Students Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°10 : Blog Your Way To A Better Job Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°9 : Face-booked Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°8 : Abraham Lincoln – A Great President? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°7 : The Origin Of the Word "Spam" Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°6 : Recessionary Rock Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°5 : US Build Killer Robots Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°4 : Berlin's Underground Spirit Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°3 : London's French Side Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°2 : New Eating Disorder Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°1 : Silent Menace

Enrichir votre vocabulaire d’anglais en quelques clics, ça vous dit ? Avec son partenaire MyCow, letudiant.fr vous propose de (re)découvrir des notions-clés dans de très nombreux thèmes, grâce à la lecture "active" d’articles rédigés par des journalistes anglo-saxons : il vous suffit de passer votre souris sur le mot souligné pour en avoir la traduction ! Et pour améliorer votre prononciation, écoutez le texte lu par un anglophone, en qualité audio mp3.

Résumé en français : depuis des années, le docteur Gao Yaojie se bat pour que le gouvernement chinois soit plus transparent sur la situation du sida  et prenne des mesures contre le trafic de sang.

In the 1990s, HIV was spreading rapidly through the poor rural population of the eastern province of Henan in China. Farmers were selling blood at unsanitary collection centres. "Give your blood if you want a good life," was a slogan coined by officials.
During the transfusions, the blood drawn from donors was being put into a community vat.
The blood plasma was broken down into elements of albumin, globulin, and platelets and used by companies to produce expensive medicines, which was very profitable for both the government and the medical industry.
The remaining and mixed blood was re-injected into the donors, enabling a single HIV carrier to infect a large group very quickly.
Dr Gao was the first person in China to bring this extremely dangerous practice to public attention.
She visited villages in Henan to educate people on how to stop the spread of HIV/Aids and became well known in China and worldwide for her Aids prevention work.
She used her fame to denounce the three major problems contributing to the AIDS crisis in China. The first is the spread of HIV through infected blood in blood banks. The second problem, according to Gao, are serious misconceptions Chinese people have about AIDS patients, making public prevention efforts difficult. Official government opinion is that HIV is spread mainly though sexual contact and drug abuse, rather than blood transfusions. The last problem is corruption and Dr Gao accuses officials in China of still profiting from trading in illegal blood.
She spent all her prizes and remuneration in printing books and leaflets for AIDS prevention.
For years, the Chinese government denied the existence of HIV and Aids in China.
For her trouble, she has been repeatedly placed under house arrest. China has relented, as the extent of its hidden AIDS problem became more evident.
Today, brave Dr Gao is in her 80s and lives in the United States. Hillary Clinton, the US secretary of state, is thought to be particularly interested in protecting the heroic Mrs Gao. The two women have met a number of times and Mrs Clinton personally made sure that Dr Gao was able to receive an award for her work in the US in 2007.
In a recent speech in Washington Gao explained that she may never be able to return to China safely. She was referring to the arrest of Tan Zuoren, a Sichuan-based activist. Tan was put on trial earlier this year for revealing the true number of dead children after an earthquake in 2008.
"I am aware I may be buried on foreign soil. But I must tell the truth about China's Aids epidemic, I have no choice." she said.

Dr. Gao Yaojie once called herself a failure in preventing the spread of AIDS in China. But the real failure, it seems, is the existing system under the communist regime.

By John English
Ecoutez le MP3
Pour améliorer votre prononciation, écoutez ce texte en audio mp3, lu par un anglophone
Aller plus loin
mycow apprendre anglais> Progresser en langues
> Partir étudier à l'étranger
> Tout savoir sur le bac 2011
> Booster son niveau en langues
> Tout pour réussir les langues au bac
> Nos quizz d'anglais
> Décrocher un job d’été à l’étranger
> Trouver un job d’été à Londres
> Les offres de jobs à l'étranger
> Les offres de stages à l'étranger
> Portrait : Partir étudier en Angleterre selon Chloé, étudiante en droit à Londres
> Vidéo : Les conseils d'un professeur d'anglais pour réussir vos révisions du bac
À consulter aussi : les autres leçons d'anglais en texte et audio