Fiche de révision de vocabulaire d'anglais - Expatriates: is the grass really greener on the other side?

Anglais
Lycée, Supérieur

Leçon 13 : Expatriates: is the grass really greener on the other side?

Enrichissez votre vocabulaire d’anglais en passant votre souris sur les mots soulignés pour en avoir la traduction.

Résumé en français : Expatriation : l'herbe est-elle vraiment plus verte ailleurs ?


Expatriates: is the grass really greener on the other side ?

Every year, thousands of people uproot and make a new start abroad . They are often tempted by the promises of sunnier weather and a better quality of life . According to a recent survey by Halifax International. Britons also escape the UK to seek employment , and some to escape the ‘deteriorating nature of society’ in Britain . A feeling of dissatisfaction in Britain prevailed . But is the grass really greener on the other side?
Once they have packed their bags, said their goodbyes to friends and family and begun a new chapter in their lives, many people feel that they have made the right decision. But for some, it is not obvious straight away – if at all - and they begin to question their decision. Difficulties in understanding the language, culture or traditions of a country can sometimes be overwhelming.
How migrants feel about their new home can depend on the country. In a poll of more than 2,000 Britons living in 12 countries, New Zealand came out on top as the best country to emigrate to. Other countries in the list included Canada, Australia and France. Despite their wealth , Singapore and Hong Kong came last .
Most migrants work as engineers, teachers, economists, accountants , IT professionals or in the financial services. Many find their wages go up . However , life is more of a struggle - especially in these times - for expatriates such as retirees who live on a fixed income . The weak pound and strong inflation work against them.
Spain has always been a favourite of the British. Yet due to the economic slump , many British expatriates in Spain have been forced to return. The Spanish economy is suffering , job opportunities are drying up and house prices are crashing . The euro is strong , but the local economy is weak. Up to 17% of the population is out of work.
It is not just the British who are moving back . Nicknamed the ‘boomerang return’, thousands of professional Australians are going back home every month . More than 400,000 Australians live in Britain but many are now planning to return home. British newspaper The Times even ran an editorial pleading for trained Australians to stay . Julia Ross, who owns a global recruitment company, thinks it is not only due to the crisis but also to bad weather: “The lifestyle in Australia becomes more attractive , and we are seeing even more people wanting to come home.”
Apparently though, even if times are hard, you won’t find many people complaining (and not just because they are British!) 41% of people are very happy with their new life abroad and never want to return to the UK. The majority of the remaining 59% are also happier now that they have expatriated.
No one puts it better, however, than Adrian Wrigglesworth, a former salesman from Yorkshire who moved to San Pedro del Pinatar nine years ago . He says he is not going anywhere . “ If the worst came to the worst , if I became poor and miserable, I’d rather do it in the sun.”

By Bex

 

 

 

 

 

1 avis
Notez
Clarté du contenu
Utilité du contenu
Qualité du contenu
Donnez votre évaluation
Fiche de révision de vocabulaire d'anglais - Expatriates: is the grass really greener on the other side?
* Champs obligatoires
Votre commentaire
Vos notes
Clarté du contenu
Utilité du contenu
Qualité du contenu
dywenqueen publié le 08/08/2016

Je trouve que c'est un très bon moyen pour améliorer sont niveau d'anglais se que je préfère le plus c'est les expressions et les mots "souligné "qui sont traduit.

Clarté du contenu
Utilité du contenu
Qualité du contenu