1. Examens
  2. Tests et examens de langues
  3. Anglais : améliorer son vocabulaire
  4. Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°58 : Should we stop eating meat?

Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°58 : Should we stop eating meat?

Envoyer cet article à un ami

Enrichir votre vocabulaire d’anglais en quelques clics, ça vous dit ? Avec son partenaire MyCow, letudiant.fr vous propose de (re)découvrir des notions-clés dans de très nombreux thèmes, grâce à la lecture "active" d’articles rédigés par des journalistes anglo-saxons : il vous suffit de passer votre souris sur le mot souligné pour en avoir la traduction ! Et pour améliorer votre prononciation, écoutez le texte lu par un anglophone, en qualité audio mp3.

Résumé en français : notre consommation de viande a un impact sur l'environnement, et la diminuer serait bénéfique à la terre... sans pour autant nuire à notre santé.

We are hearing more and more about the effects on the environment and on our health of eating too much meat. Producing meat is harmful for the environment as raising animals requires energy, water and land, and cows produce the greenhouse gas methane.

As for our health, eating too much meat can cause obesity, heart disease and type 2 diabetes. However, on the other hand, we get vital minerals and other nutrients from meat, many people earn a living through raising animals and meat has become an important part in many of our diets. So what do we need to do?

According to Tim Lang, professor of food policy at City University in London, meat consumption is ‘out of control.’ He advises the World Health Organisation, as well as the Department for the Environment, on food policy.

‘If you were growing meat yourself, it is an incredibly slow process and killing and eating an animal is a special day. At Christmas if we were well off we had beef. It was a big deal. We killed an animal as an exception, for a feast,’ he told the press. Lang advocates eating meat once a week at the most.

Celebrities are also joining the argument. Sir Paul McCartney advocates Meat-Free Mondays. On the movement’s website, he says: ‘I think many of us feel helpless in the face of environmental challenges’, adding that: ‘Having one designated meat free day a week is actually a meaningful change that everyone can make, that goes to the heart of several important political, environmental and ethical issues all at once.’ The movement has received a lot of support from celebrities, including Gwyneth Paltrow, Joanna Lumley and Sir Richard Branson.

The movement cites research from various environmental networks. It explains that the UK’s Food Climate Research Network believes that food production is responsible for between 20 to 30 percent of global green house gas emissions. (And livestock production is responsible for around half of these emissions.) And the United Nation’s Food and Agriculture Organisation has concluded that the livestock sector is ‘one of the top two or three most significant contributors to the most serious environmental problems, at every scale from local to global.’

Even though when it comes to climate change we hear more about pollution that we do about the food industry, the group Compassion in World Farming estimates that if the average UK household halved its consumption of meat this would cut more emissions that if car use was cut in half. Some people even estimate that 20 vegetarians can be fed on the amount of land needed to feed one person consuming a meat-based diet. Growing crops to feed animals means there is less land on which to grow crops for humans.

We’re on course to double meat production by 2050. Whilst few people are saying we should stop eating meat altogether, there’s no denying that cutting back could have positive consequences for us and the planet.


By Bex

Écoutez le MP3

Pour améliorer votre prononciation, écoutez ce texte en audio mp3, lu par un anglophone
Aller plus loin

- Étudier dans un lycée américain : comme dans les séries TV ?
- Langues : tous les tests et les examens pour évaluer votre niveau
- Progresser en langues
- Partir étudier à l'étranger
Tout savoir sur le bac 2011
- Booster son niveau en langues
- Tout pour réussir les langues au bac
- Nos quizz d'anglais
- Décrocher un job d’été à l’étranger
- Trouver un job d’été à Londres
- Les offres de jobs à l'étranger
- Les offres de stages à l'étranger
- Portrait : Partir étudier en Angleterre selon Chloé, étudiante en droit à Londres
- Vidéo : Les conseils d'un professeur d'anglais pour réussir vos révisions du bac
À consulter aussi

mycow apprendre anglais43 leçons d'anglais pour enrichir votre vocabulaire

- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°1 : Silent Menace
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°2 : New Eating Disorder
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°3 : London's French Side
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°4 : Berlin's Underground Spirit
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°5 : US Build Killer Robots
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°6 : Recessionary Rock
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°7 : The Origin Of the Word "Spam"
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°8 : Abraham Lincoln – A Great President?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°9 : Face-booked
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°10 : Blog Your Way To A Better Job
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°11 : Bad News For Students
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°12 : Reality TV
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°13 : Expatriates: is the grass really greener on the other side?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°14 : Gap Years
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°15 : “Twitter Is Useless”
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°16 : Flash Mobbing
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°17 : Hungry World
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°18 : Mrs Gao: And The Hidden Truth Of AIDS In China
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°19 : Alcohol, the worst drug ?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°20 : UK And France Call For Anonymous CV’s
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°21 : MBAs – is the class diverse enough ?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°22 : China is in first place to make clean energy
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°23 : Bamboccioni - The Italian Word for a Global Trend
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°24 : How to choose an MBA school...
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°25 : Compensatory Ethics
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°26 : When will I be famous?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°27 : Should Politics Serve The Markets Or Tame Them?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°28 : Lads’ Mags
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°29 : Working for humanitarian organisations
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°30 : Who Wants To Be A Teacher?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°31 : UK, Retirement Age To Rise To 66 Years Old
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°32 : What’s Eating India?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°33 : Historical fiction
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°34 : Why the English need to learn another language
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°35 : The Graduates' Difficulties
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°36 : Fertility tourism
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°37 : A British view of the French education system
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°38 : Nick Leeson - UK’s Jerome Kerviel
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°39 : Student Protest Divides Nation
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°40 : Rapper Jay-Z releases new book
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°41 : The music business - Profit or loss ?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°42 : Where is Haiti now?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°43 : Do we work too much ?

Sommaire du dossier
Retour au dossier Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°64 - Twitter : what you can and can't say Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°63 : London Olympics security Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°62 - Pinterest : the Wikipedia of search Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°61 - The rise of the e-book : can anyone get published ? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°60 : Financing your studies Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°59 : One in three unemployed people are convicted criminals Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°58 : Should we stop eating meat? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°57 : Teen entrepreneurs Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°56 : Youth unemployment in the UK Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°55 : United Kingdom or Disunited Kingdom ? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°54 : Should teens be allowed to vote ? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°53 : British and American English Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°52 : School uniform Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°51 : Technology addiction Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°50 : A medieval tradition alive today Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°49 : Organ donation Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°48 - Cyber-Bullying : A Modern Problem Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°47 - Internships : are they fair ? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°46 : Do you speak Globish? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°45 : Smart Drugs Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°44 : Where Have All the Law Jobs Gone ?