1. Examens
  2. Tests et examens de langues
  3. Anglais : améliorer son vocabulaire
  4. Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°44 : Where Have All the Law Jobs Gone ?

Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°44 : Where Have All the Law Jobs Gone ?

Envoyer cet article à un ami

Enrichir votre vocabulaire d’anglais en quelques clics, ça vous dit ? Avec son partenaire MyCow, letudiant.fr vous propose de (re)découvrir des notions-clés dans de très nombreux thèmes, grâce à la lecture "active" d’articles rédigés par des journalistes anglo-saxons : il vous suffit de passer votre souris sur le mot souligné pour en avoir la traduction ! Et pour améliorer votre prononciation, écoutez le texte lu par un anglophone, en qualité audio mp3.

Cliquez ici pour consulter les leçons d'anglais précédentes

Résumé en français : très courtisés il y a peu, les jeunes avocats américains souffrent de la conjoncture actuelle et s'inquiètent pour leur avenir.

He was making $3,000 a week, playing video games all day and sleeping as long as he wanted... but he wanted to work.

And he needed to pay off some serious loans.

Meet Mike*—a 30 year old lawyer in New York City who held a minor position with a major law firm. Just a year out of law school, he was among the ten percent of law school graduates who get hired into “Big Law”, where the average starting salary is $160,000. The rest of his classmates could expect $40,000 a year... but only if they found a job.

Things were going well until Mike, along with dozens of other newly hired lawyers, was informed of an unexpected performance review.” A man he never met before read a generic statement scolding them for poor performance.

Then they were unofficially laid off, and paid a retainer to do “volunteer” work around the firm ... or use their time to find another job. That way, Mike said, the company wouldn’t look like it had fired anyone, was in any sort of financial trouble, or had hired bad people; to the rest of the world, their newest employees had merely gone elsewhere. The poor performance review was blackmail—if they complained about being fired, the performance review would go public, black-marking them for the rest of their soon-to-be hopeless careers. So Mike kept quiet, looked for work, played a lot of “Modern Warfare 2,” and lived in fear of back payments on his $160,000 law school debt.

That’s a familiar story for Jeff, 29, a graduate of the prestigious Duke Law School, who currently lives in Washington, DC. Supported by his wife’s work as a secretary, his primary occupation is sending out resumes in search of paying work. Jeff faces a work environment where the oldest lawyers continue to practice, instead of retiring as they may have if their stock-linked retirement funds were worth more money.

The vacancies they normally leave every year make room at the entry-level... which isn’t happening at the rate the nation’s 150,000 currently enrolled law students need.

It comes back to the economy: less money is being spent on litigation, research, acquisitions etc meaning that there is less money to support the existing staff at law firms... and less money available to hire new talent. Sectors like mergers and acquisitions, a cornerstone of “Big Law,” are so slow that firms in Boston, New York, London, Melbourne, and elsewhere are going out of business.

The hemorrhage of lawyers from these domains means increased competition in bankruptcy law and other areas thriving on our economic disaster. For instance, in the US, finance and government lawyers are doing well as they help companies navigate the various economic stimulus packages. New graduates like Jeff must compete against experienced lawyers, or occupy their time with pro bono clerkships, internships, and non-profit advocacy work... which doesn’t pay for rent, food, or those enormous tuition bills.

Every year, law schools turn out another forty to fifty thousand law students in need of employment. It’s a bull market for free labor, but the worst time in decades for students and young law professionals—even lawyers have to eat.

*Due to paranoia among those interviewed, all names have been changed.


By Norman

Ecoutez le MP3
Pour améliorer votre prononciation, écoutez ce texte en audio mp3, lu par un anglophone
Aller plus loin
> Progresser en langues
> Partir étudier à l'étranger
> Tout savoir sur le bac 2011
> Booster son niveau en langues
> Tout pour réussir les langues au bac
> Nos quizz d'anglais
> Décrocher un job d’été à l’étranger
> Trouver un job d’été à Londres
> Les offres de jobs à l'étranger
> Les offres de stages à l'étranger
> Portrait : Partir étudier en Angleterre selon Chloé, étudiante en droit à Londres
> Vidéo : Les conseils d'un professeur d'anglais pour réussir vos révisions du bac
À consulter aussi

43 leçons d'anglais pour enrichir votre vocabulaire

mycow apprendre anglais- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°1 : Silent Menace
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°2 : New Eating Disorder
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°3 : London's French Side
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°4 : Berlin's Underground Spirit
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°5 : US Build Killer Robots
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°6 : Recessionary Rock
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°7 : The Origin Of the Word "Spam"
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°8 : Abraham Lincoln – A Great President?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°9 : Face-booked
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°10 : Blog Your Way To A Better Job
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°11 : Bad News For Students
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°12 : Reality TV
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°13 : Expatriates: is the grass really greener on the other side?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°14 : Gap Years
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°15 : “Twitter Is Useless”
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°16 : Flash Mobbing
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°17 : Hungry World
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°18 : Mrs Gao: And The Hidden Truth Of AIDS In China
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°19 : Alcohol, the worst drug ?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°20 : UK And France Call For Anonymous CV’s
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°21 : MBAs – is the class diverse enough ?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°22 : China is in first place to make clean energy
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°23 : Bamboccioni - The Italian Word for a Global Trend
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°24 : How to choose an MBA school...
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°25 : Compensatory Ethics
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°26 : When will I be famous?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°27 : Should Politics Serve The Markets Or Tame Them?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°28 : Lads’ Mags
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°29 : Working for humanitarian organisations
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°30 : Who Wants To Be A Teacher?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°31 : UK, Retirement Age To Rise To 66 Years Old
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°32 : What’s Eating India?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°33 : Historical fiction
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°34 : Why the English need to learn another language
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°35 : The Graduates' Difficulties
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°36 : Fertility tourism
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°37 : A British view of the French education system
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°38 : Nick Leeson - UK’s Jerome Kerviel
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°39 : Student Protest Divides Nation
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°40 : Rapper Jay-Z releases new book
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°41 : The music business - Profit or loss ?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°42 : Where is Haiti now?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°43 : Do we work too much ?

Sommaire du dossier
Retour au dossier Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°64 - Twitter : what you can and can't say Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°63 : London Olympics security Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°62 - Pinterest : the Wikipedia of search Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°61 - The rise of the e-book : can anyone get published ? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°60 : Financing your studies Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°59 : One in three unemployed people are convicted criminals Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°58 : Should we stop eating meat? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°57 : Teen entrepreneurs Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°56 : Youth unemployment in the UK Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°55 : United Kingdom or Disunited Kingdom ? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°54 : Should teens be allowed to vote ? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°53 : British and American English Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°52 : School uniform Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°51 : Technology addiction Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°50 : A medieval tradition alive today Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°49 : Organ donation Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°48 - Cyber-Bullying : A Modern Problem Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°47 - Internships : are they fair ? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°46 : Do you speak Globish? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°45 : Smart Drugs Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°44 : Where Have All the Law Jobs Gone ?