1. Examens
  2. Tests et examens de langues
  3. Anglais : améliorer son vocabulaire
  4. Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°45 : Smart Drugs

Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°45 : Smart Drugs

Envoyer cet article à un ami

Enrichir votre vocabulaire d’anglais en quelques clics, ça vous dit ? Avec son partenaire MyCow, letudiant.fr vous propose de (re)découvrir des notions-clés dans de très nombreux thèmes, grâce à la lecture "active" d’articles rédigés par des journalistes anglo-saxons : il vous suffit de passer votre souris sur le mot souligné pour en avoir la traduction ! Et pour améliorer votre prononciation, écoutez le texte lu par un anglophone, en qualité audio mp3.

Cliquez ici pour consulter les leçons d'anglais précédentes en texte et audio

Résumé en français : conçues à l'origine pour les victimes de troubles de la mémoire, les nootropiques, drogues qui stimulent l'intelligence, sont aujourd'hui utilisées par des étudiants qui cherchent à améliorer leurs performances.
 
A significant rise in the number of students using ‘smart drugs’ could lead to routine drug tests in the near future. An article published in the Journal of Medical Ethics reported that one in four students at some American universities have taken stimulants. This is especially the case in competitive colleges. It is also believed that their use has spread to Britain.

Students use the so-called ‘smart drugs’ in order to boost academic performance and to get them through exams. As a result, scientists believe that routine drug-testing could become inevitable. The drugs used by students are normally taken by sufferers of the sleep disorder narcolepsy, Alzheimer’s or Attention Deficit Disorder.

The drugs are stimulants which are designed to improve memory and concentration. Users say the drugs help them to concentrate and to focus, and this has been backed up by the findings of research studies.

However, banning the drugs would be almost impossible, and so the situation poses a real challenge for society. The only possible option would be testing students in the same way that athletes are tested. Writing in the Journal of Medical Ethics, psychologist Vince Cakic said: ‘As laughable as it may seem, it is possible that scenarios such as urine testing could very well come to fruition in the future.

Given that the benefits of the drugs could also be derived during periods of study at any time leading up to the examinations, this would require drug testing during non-exam periods.’

Complicating the matters further, not everyone sees a problem with the use of smart drugs. For some, the argument for banning the drugs because they offer an unfair advantage is no different to banning private schools for the same reason. And Mr. Cakic admitted that it was not clear whether using the drugs was necessarily wrong.

Professor John Harris, the director of the Institute for Science, Ethics and Innovation at the University of Manchester, even went so far as defending the use of the drugs. He said that it was ‘not rational to be against human enhancement’. He believes that it is a natural extension of the education process.

However, what the experts do agree on is the fact that the long-term safety of the drugs is not known. The drug Ritalin, often used for cases of Attention Deficit Disorder, is thought to carry the most risk because it has been known to affect the heart.

At the moment, Mr. Cakic says that the impact of the drugs is ‘modest’, but stronger versions could be developed. For Mr. Cakic, the problem boils down to the pressure and competition to be found in education: ‘High school and university are the primary competitive spheres of many people’s lives, and ones that have significant bearing upon their lives, in terms of both career opportunities and future earning capacity’, he said. He believes that ‘the pressure to succeed academically is very real’ and therefore , the temptation of a helping hand is difficult to resist. ‘The possibility of purchasing smartness in a bottle” is likely to have broad appeal to students’, Mr. Cakic said, adding that ‘they are in quest of an advantage in an ever more competitive world.’


By Bex

Ecoutez le MP3
Pour améliorer votre prononciation, écoutez ce texte en audio mp3, lu par un anglophone
Aller plus loin
> Progresser en langues
> Partir étudier à l'étranger
> Tout savoir sur le bac 2011
> Booster son niveau en langues
> Tout pour réussir les langues au bac
> Nos quizz d'anglais
> Décrocher un job d’été à l’étranger
> Trouver un job d’été à Londres
> Les offres de jobs à l'étranger
> Les offres de stages à l'étranger
> Portrait : Partir étudier en Angleterre selon Chloé, étudiante en droit à Londres
> Vidéo : Les conseils d'un professeur d'anglais pour réussir vos révisions du bac
À consulter aussi

43 leçons d'anglais pour enrichir votre vocabulaire

mycow apprendre anglais- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°1 : Silent Menace
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°2 : New Eating Disorder
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°3 : London's French Side
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°4 : Berlin's Underground Spirit
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°5 : US Build Killer Robots
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°6 : Recessionary Rock
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°7 : The Origin Of the Word "Spam"
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°8 : Abraham Lincoln – A Great President?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°9 : Face-booked
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°10 : Blog Your Way To A Better Job
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°11 : Bad News For Students
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°12 : Reality TV
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°13 : Expatriates: is the grass really greener on the other side?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°14 : Gap Years
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°15 : “Twitter Is Useless”
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°16 : Flash Mobbing
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°17 : Hungry World
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°18 : Mrs Gao: And The Hidden Truth Of AIDS In China
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°19 : Alcohol, the worst drug ?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°20 : UK And France Call For Anonymous CV’s
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°21 : MBAs – is the class diverse enough ?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°22 : China is in first place to make clean energy
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°23 : Bamboccioni - The Italian Word for a Global Trend
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°24 : How to choose an MBA school...
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°25 : Compensatory Ethics
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°26 : When will I be famous?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°27 : Should Politics Serve The Markets Or Tame Them?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°28 : Lads’ Mags
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°29 : Working for humanitarian organisations
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°30 : Who Wants To Be A Teacher?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°31 : UK, Retirement Age To Rise To 66 Years Old
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°32 : What’s Eating India?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°33 : Historical fiction
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°34 : Why the English need to learn another language
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°35 : The Graduates' Difficulties
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°36 : Fertility tourism
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°37 : A British view of the French education system
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°38 : Nick Leeson - UK’s Jerome Kerviel
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°39 : Student Protest Divides Nation
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°40 : Rapper Jay-Z releases new book
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°41 : The music business - Profit or loss ?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°42 : Where is Haiti now?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°43 : Do we work too much ?

Sommaire du dossier
Retour au dossier Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°64 - Twitter : what you can and can't say Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°63 : London Olympics security Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°62 - Pinterest : the Wikipedia of search Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°61 - The rise of the e-book : can anyone get published ? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°60 : Financing your studies Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°59 : One in three unemployed people are convicted criminals Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°58 : Should we stop eating meat? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°57 : Teen entrepreneurs Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°56 : Youth unemployment in the UK Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°55 : United Kingdom or Disunited Kingdom ? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°54 : Should teens be allowed to vote ? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°53 : British and American English Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°52 : School uniform Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°51 : Technology addiction Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°50 : A medieval tradition alive today Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°49 : Organ donation Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°48 - Cyber-Bullying : A Modern Problem Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°47 - Internships : are they fair ? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°46 : Do you speak Globish? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°45 : Smart Drugs Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°44 : Where Have All the Law Jobs Gone ?