1. Examens
  2. Tests et examens de langues
  3. Anglais : améliorer son vocabulaire
  4. Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°47 - Internships : are they fair ?

Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°47 - Internships : are they fair ?

Envoyer cet article à un ami

Enrichir votre vocabulaire d’anglais en quelques clics, ça vous dit ? Avec son partenaire MyCow, letudiant.fr vous propose de (re)découvrir des notions-clés dans de très nombreux thèmes, grâce à la lecture "active" d’articles rédigés par des journalistes anglo-saxons : il vous suffit de passer votre souris sur le mot souligné pour en avoir la traduction ! Et pour améliorer votre prononciation, écoutez le texte lu par un anglophone, en qualité audio mp3.

Cliquez ici pour consulter les leçons d'anglais précédentes en texte et audio
Résumé en français : sous-payés et n'offrant aucune sécurité, les stages restent souvent le seul moyen d'acquérir une expérience professionnelle à la sortie des études.

Internships is the American word, ‘placements’ is the English word, but both describe the same phenomena, young people working in companies on ‘work experience schemes’ to try and make them more attractive to employers, who will be seduced into offering them a proper job in either the same company or a similar one in the same field.

They are an increasingly common way of easing young people into the world of work throughout the developed world; but are they fair? Internships have been criticised as a way that companies can get cheap, even free labour without offering anything in return. Despite this disadvantage – most common in the professions for which entry is highly competitive, because they are seen as eventually well-paid or glamorous – young people are fighting for internships with companies and in professions that seem highly attractive.

And it is precisely this that makes internships potentially unfair from two other points of view. Internships that are intensely competed-for are often created in an ad-hoc manner, and it’s hard to find out about them, let alone compete for them in an environment that is open to kids of all abilities and social backgrounds. Very often a company will try a new employee through an internship because existing employees, at a high level, want to give an opportunity to friends, family and people within their ‘network.’ The principle of free, fair and open competition does not apply.

The other disadvantage for an ordinary kid wanting a start in advertising, finance, law, media, etc, all professions which extensively use the internship scheme, is that they would be unable to support themselves during 3 month periods of reduced or indeed no wages at all while they gather necessary experience. It is inevitably the children of families that are able to subsidies their sons and daughters for long periods that benefit from internship schemes that are increasingly, in a tough job market, getting away with paying young hopefuls nothing at all.
A new development is companies that promise to find and place students in internships for a fee. After the hopeful parents pay the fee, the companies have been known to actually charge the worker for the privilege of working for them and getting the much sought-after work experience.

From the companies point of view, one wonders if the short-term benefit of using young people as cheap or free or even paying labour and acquiring them from the known networks of the wealthy isn’t in the long-term outweighed by the disadvantage of always drawing new recruits from the same social strata and, inevitably having to take weak, less intelligent, less skilful and talented workers.
The competitive health of a company surely resides in its ability to attract the brightest and most able kids irrespective of where they came from and their social background and class. Employing a young person straight out of university, having put them through a rigorous interview and training process, but offering them a secure, reasonably-paid contract would be a mark of confidence not just in the student but in the companies' ability to recognise and groom young talent.


By PCampbell

Ecoutez le MP3
Pour améliorer votre prononciation, écoutez ce texte en audio mp3, lu par un anglophone
Aller plus loin
> Étudier dans un lycée américain : comme dans les séries TV ?
> Langues : tous les tests et les examens pour évaluer votre niveau
> Progresser en langues
> Partir étudier à l'étranger
> Tout savoir sur le bac 2011
> Booster son niveau en langues
> Tout pour réussir les langues au bac
> Nos quizz d'anglais
> Décrocher un job d’été à l’étranger
> Trouver un job d’été à Londres
> Les offres de jobs à l'étranger
> Les offres de stages à l'étranger
> Portrait : Partir étudier en Angleterre selon Chloé, étudiante en droit à Londres
> Vidéo : Les conseils d'un professeur d'anglais pour réussir vos révisions du bac
À consulter aussi

43 leçons d'anglais pour enrichir votre vocabulaire

mycow apprendre anglais- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°1 : Silent Menace
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°2 : New Eating Disorder
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°3 : London's French Side
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°4 : Berlin's Underground Spirit
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°5 : US Build Killer Robots
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°6 : Recessionary Rock
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°7 : The Origin Of the Word "Spam"
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°8 : Abraham Lincoln – A Great President?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°9 : Face-booked
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°10 : Blog Your Way To A Better Job
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°11 : Bad News For Students
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°12 : Reality TV
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°13 : Expatriates: is the grass really greener on the other side?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°14 : Gap Years
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°15 : “Twitter Is Useless”
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°16 : Flash Mobbing
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°17 : Hungry World
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°18 : Mrs Gao: And The Hidden Truth Of AIDS In China
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°19 : Alcohol, the worst drug ?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°20 : UK And France Call For Anonymous CV’s
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°21 : MBAs – is the class diverse enough ?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°22 : China is in first place to make clean energy
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°23 : Bamboccioni - The Italian Word for a Global Trend
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°24 : How to choose an MBA school...
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°25 : Compensatory Ethics
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°26 : When will I be famous?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°27 : Should Politics Serve The Markets Or Tame Them?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°28 : Lads’ Mags
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°29 : Working for humanitarian organisations
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°30 : Who Wants To Be A Teacher?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°31 : UK, Retirement Age To Rise To 66 Years Old
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°32 : What’s Eating India?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°33 : Historical fiction
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°34 : Why the English need to learn another language
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°35 : The Graduates' Difficulties
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°36 : Fertility tourism
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°37 : A British view of the French education system
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°38 : Nick Leeson - UK’s Jerome Kerviel
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°39 : Student Protest Divides Nation
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°40 : Rapper Jay-Z releases new book
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°41 : The music business - Profit or loss ?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°42 : Where is Haiti now?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°43 : Do we work too much ?
Sommaire du dossier
Retour au dossier Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°64 - Twitter : what you can and can't say Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°63 : London Olympics security Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°62 - Pinterest : the Wikipedia of search Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°61 - The rise of the e-book : can anyone get published ? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°60 : Financing your studies Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°59 : One in three unemployed people are convicted criminals Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°58 : Should we stop eating meat? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°57 : Teen entrepreneurs Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°56 : Youth unemployment in the UK Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°55 : United Kingdom or Disunited Kingdom ? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°54 : Should teens be allowed to vote ? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°53 : British and American English Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°52 : School uniform Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°51 : Technology addiction Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°50 : A medieval tradition alive today Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°49 : Organ donation Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°48 - Cyber-Bullying : A Modern Problem Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°47 - Internships : are they fair ? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°46 : Do you speak Globish? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°45 : Smart Drugs Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°44 : Where Have All the Law Jobs Gone ?