1. Examens
  2. Tests et examens de langues
  3. Anglais : améliorer son vocabulaire
  4. Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°57 : Teen entrepreneurs

Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°57 : Teen entrepreneurs

Envoyer cet article à un ami

Enrichir votre vocabulaire d’anglais en quelques clics, ça vous dit ? Avec son partenaire MyCow, letudiant.fr vous propose de (re)découvrir des notions-clés dans de très nombreux thèmes, grâce à la lecture "active" d’articles rédigés par des journalistes anglo-saxons : il vous suffit de passer votre souris sur le mot souligné pour en avoir la traduction ! Et pour améliorer votre prononciation, écoutez le texte lu par un anglophone, en qualité audio mp3.

Résumé en français : beaucoup de personnes rêvent de créer leur propre entreprise, et quelques uns réalisent ce rêve avant même de sortir de l'adolescence.

When he was nine years old, Cameron Johnson launched his first business out of his home in Virginia, making invitations for his parents’ holiday party. By the age of 11, he had saved up several thousand dollars by selling greeting cards.

Meanwhile, 14-year-old Fraser Doherty was following his grandmother’s recipe for home-made jams in Edinburgh. Word soon spread as friends and neighbours talked about how good the jams were. And Fraser started receiving orders faster than he could make the jams. In the end, he rented time at a factory several days a month. At 16, he decided to leave school in order to work full time. And in early 2007, Waitrose, a high-end supermarket in the UK, approached Fraser, hoping to sell his Superjam products in their stores. Tesco, the country’s largest supermarket, soon followed.

It is many people’s dream to run their own business, be their own boss and do something they are passionate about. For more and more young people, this is becoming a reality before they even leave school.

In the UK, a popular show is The Young Apprentice. Twelve young people aged 16 and 17 from across the country compete in challenges to win a £25,000 prize from the British business magnate Lord Sugar. The prize money goes towards setting up a business. To get on the show, contestants have to prove that they are passionate about business and already have some work experience. Contestants this year included Hayley Forrester, who is studying for her A-levels and lives on a farm. She was inspired by drinks company Innocent to sell free range, organic eggs from her own chickens. Another contestant, Harry Hitchens, has been working since he was nine, with jobs including gardening, selling at car boot sales and magazine delivery.

On the show, the contestants are given different tasks to do in teams, such as inventing a new camping product and pitching it to retailers, icing, decorating and selling cupcakes at department store Selfridges in London, or producing an advert for a new deodorant.  At the end of each task, the two teams meet in the boardroom with Lord Sugar and one person from the losing team is fired. It is a spin-off from The Apprentice series, where business men and women compete for a £100,000-a-year job at Lord Sugar’s company.

But of course this is not the path that most teen entrepreneurs take. In reality, getting to the top means a lot of hard work. In the US, Emil Motycka started mowing lawns when he was nine years old. Now in his final year of secondary school, Motycka Enterprises, which offers lawn care, is pulling in over £200,000 – but not without hard work. Emil told the press: ‘Sleep is for the weak. I sleep four hours a night on average.’

So, what tips do teen entrepreneurs have for others who might want to follow in their footsteps? Firstly, that everyone has the ability to become an entrepreneur. And secondly, that you have to find something you enjoy doing and that is in demand. ‘With my business, I like to be outdoors and to work with my hands, which was one of the reasons I chose landscaping,’ says Lucas Rice, 18, who runs a successful landscaping business in Ohio. He also advises pricing wisely. ‘When you’re starting out, go a little lower on price in order to start capturing some customers,’ Lucas says. Finally, the golden rule: seek business; do not wait for it to come to you.

By Bex

Écoutez le MP3

Pour améliorer votre prononciation, écoutez ce texte en audio mp3, lu par un anglophone
Aller plus loin

- Étudier dans un lycée américain : comme dans les séries TV ?
- Langues : tous les tests et les examens pour évaluer votre niveau
- Progresser en langues
- Partir étudier à l'étranger
Tout savoir sur le bac 2011
- Booster son niveau en langues
- Tout pour réussir les langues au bac
- Nos quizz d'anglais
- Décrocher un job d’été à l’étranger
- Trouver un job d’été à Londres
- Les offres de jobs à l'étranger
- Les offres de stages à l'étranger
- Portrait : Partir étudier en Angleterre selon Chloé, étudiante en droit à Londres
- Vidéo : Les conseils d'un professeur d'anglais pour réussir vos révisions du bac
À consulter aussi

mycow apprendre anglais43 leçons d'anglais pour enrichir votre vocabulaire

- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°1 : Silent Menace
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°2 : New Eating Disorder
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°3 : London's French Side
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°4 : Berlin's Underground Spirit
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°5 : US Build Killer Robots
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°6 : Recessionary Rock
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°7 : The Origin Of the Word "Spam"
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°8 : Abraham Lincoln – A Great President?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°9 : Face-booked
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°10 : Blog Your Way To A Better Job
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°11 : Bad News For Students
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°12 : Reality TV
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°13 : Expatriates: is the grass really greener on the other side?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°14 : Gap Years
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°15 : “Twitter Is Useless”
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°16 : Flash Mobbing
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°17 : Hungry World
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°18 : Mrs Gao: And The Hidden Truth Of AIDS In China
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°19 : Alcohol, the worst drug ?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°20 : UK And France Call For Anonymous CV’s
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°21 : MBAs – is the class diverse enough ?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°22 : China is in first place to make clean energy
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°23 : Bamboccioni - The Italian Word for a Global Trend
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°24 : How to choose an MBA school...
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°25 : Compensatory Ethics
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°26 : When will I be famous?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°27 : Should Politics Serve The Markets Or Tame Them?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°28 : Lads’ Mags
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°29 : Working for humanitarian organisations
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°30 : Who Wants To Be A Teacher?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°31 : UK, Retirement Age To Rise To 66 Years Old
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°32 : What’s Eating India?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°33 : Historical fiction
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°34 : Why the English need to learn another language
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°35 : The Graduates' Difficulties
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°36 : Fertility tourism
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°37 : A British view of the French education system
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°38 : Nick Leeson - UK’s Jerome Kerviel
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°39 : Student Protest Divides Nation
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°40 : Rapper Jay-Z releases new book
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°41 : The music business - Profit or loss ?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°42 : Where is Haiti now?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°43 : Do we work too much ?

Sommaire du dossier
Retour au dossier Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°64 - Twitter : what you can and can't say Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°63 : London Olympics security Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°62 - Pinterest : the Wikipedia of search Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°61 - The rise of the e-book : can anyone get published ? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°60 : Financing your studies Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°59 : One in three unemployed people are convicted criminals Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°58 : Should we stop eating meat? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°57 : Teen entrepreneurs Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°56 : Youth unemployment in the UK Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°55 : United Kingdom or Disunited Kingdom ? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°54 : Should teens be allowed to vote ? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°53 : British and American English Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°52 : School uniform Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°51 : Technology addiction Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°50 : A medieval tradition alive today Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°49 : Organ donation Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°48 - Cyber-Bullying : A Modern Problem Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°47 - Internships : are they fair ? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°46 : Do you speak Globish? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°45 : Smart Drugs Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°44 : Where Have All the Law Jobs Gone ?