1. Examens
  2. Tests et examens de langues
  3. Anglais : améliorer son vocabulaire
  4. Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°59 : One in three unemployed people are convicted criminals

Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°59 : One in three unemployed people are convicted criminals

Envoyer cet article à un ami

Enrichir votre vocabulaire d’anglais en quelques clics, ça vous dit ? Avec son partenaire MyCow, letudiant.fr vous propose de (re)découvrir des notions-clés dans de très nombreux thèmes, grâce à la lecture "active" d’articles rédigés par des journalistes anglo-saxons : il vous suffit de passer votre souris sur le mot souligné pour en avoir la traduction ! Et pour améliorer votre prononciation, écoutez le texte lu par un anglophone, en qualité audio mp3.

Résumé en français : une étude révèle qu'un chômeur sur trois au Royaume-Uni a un casier judiciaire, des chiffres alarmants qui poussent le gouvernement à prendre des mesures pour aider les anciens criminels à accéder au monde du travail.

According to the first analysis ever done on the subject, 400,000 of the 1.2 million people currently on unemployment benefits in the UK have been convicted of an offence.

Almost half of those released from prison in 2008 were still claiming benefits two years later.

The study was commissioned by the government. The official analysis was made possible by a data sharing agreement between the Ministry of Justice and the Department for Work and Pensions.

Ministers have described the figures as ‘truly alarming’. Conservative MP Philip Davies said: ‘Given that so many of these people are criminals, it makes you wonder how many are actually seeking work and available to work. It appears that the taxpayer is paying twice. We are being attacked on the one hand as victims of crime and on the other we seem to be paying for them to go out and commit more crimes.’

The government is considering bringing in specialist work programmes for offenders so that they do not become dependent on state benefits. It could equally be argued, of course, that ex-offenders are not choosing to stay on benefits but rather employers are wary about hiring them. With that in mind, new work programmes will also provide incentives for employers to hire those with a criminal record.

Minister for employment Chris Grayling said: ‘This is the first time any government has done detailed analysis of the link between offending and the welfare state, and it paints a truly alarming picture. This just underlined why we have said that Britain needs a rehabilitation revolution, and particularly to help former offenders into sustained employment.’

The current climate is also a factor as unemployment is increasing generally. A separate study by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development has revealed that job hunters face the toughest market in two decades. The number of people in work is predicted to fall by 120,000 in 2012, and peak in mid-2013.

The analysis comes several months after it was announced that unemployed offenders would have to work unpaid for at least 28 hours over four days, with a fifth day spent looking for a job, if they are sentenced to ‘Community Payback’. Prisons and probation minister Crispin Blunt said: ‘If you are unemployed and on Community Payback, you shouldn’t be sitting idle at home watching daytime television or hanging about with your friends on a street corner. You should be out paying back to your community through hard, honest work. It is essential we help turn offenders into ex-offenders.’ About 100,000 criminals are sentenced to Community Payback in England and Wales each year. Tasks include manual labour, clearing up litter and removing graffiti.

‘Next Step’, a government agency, advises ex-offenders looking for work. It says: ‘You have to show employers your crimes are in your past and you’re going to be a reliable, trustworthy employee. When you’re released, you could start work on your skills by doing a training course or some volunteering. Training courses and volunteering can build your confidence and give you something positive to talk about to employers.’


By Bex

Écoutez le MP3

Pour améliorer votre prononciation, écoutez ce texte en audio mp3, lu par un anglophone
Aller plus loin

- Étudier dans un lycée américain : comme dans les séries TV ?
- Langues : tous les tests et les examens pour évaluer votre niveau
- Progresser en langues
- Partir étudier à l'étranger
Tout savoir sur le bac 2011
- Booster son niveau en langues
- Tout pour réussir les langues au bac
- Nos quizz d'anglais
- Décrocher un job d’été à l’étranger
- Trouver un job d’été à Londres
- Les offres de jobs à l'étranger
- Les offres de stages à l'étranger
- Portrait : Partir étudier en Angleterre selon Chloé, étudiante en droit à Londres
- Vidéo : Les conseils d'un professeur d'anglais pour réussir vos révisions du bac
À consulter aussi

mycow apprendre anglais43 leçons d'anglais pour enrichir votre vocabulaire

- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°1 : Silent Menace
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°2 : New Eating Disorder
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°3 : London's French Side
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°4 : Berlin's Underground Spirit
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°5 : US Build Killer Robots
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°6 : Recessionary Rock
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°7 : The Origin Of the Word "Spam"
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°8 : Abraham Lincoln – A Great President?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°9 : Face-booked
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°10 : Blog Your Way To A Better Job
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°11 : Bad News For Students
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°12 : Reality TV
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°13 : Expatriates: is the grass really greener on the other side?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°14 : Gap Years
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°15 : “Twitter Is Useless”
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°16 : Flash Mobbing
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°17 : Hungry World
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°18 : Mrs Gao: And The Hidden Truth Of AIDS In China
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°19 : Alcohol, the worst drug ?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°20 : UK And France Call For Anonymous CV’s
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°21 : MBAs – is the class diverse enough ?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°22 : China is in first place to make clean energy
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°23 : Bamboccioni - The Italian Word for a Global Trend
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°24 : How to choose an MBA school...
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°25 : Compensatory Ethics
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°26 : When will I be famous?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°27 : Should Politics Serve The Markets Or Tame Them?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°28 : Lads’ Mags
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°29 : Working for humanitarian organisations
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°30 : Who Wants To Be A Teacher?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°31 : UK, Retirement Age To Rise To 66 Years Old
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°32 : What’s Eating India?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°33 : Historical fiction
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°34 : Why the English need to learn another language
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°35 : The Graduates' Difficulties
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°36 : Fertility tourism
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°37 : A British view of the French education system
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°38 : Nick Leeson - UK’s Jerome Kerviel
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°39 : Student Protest Divides Nation
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°40 : Rapper Jay-Z releases new book
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°41 : The music business - Profit or loss ?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°42 : Where is Haiti now?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°43 : Do we work too much ?

Sommaire du dossier
Retour au dossier Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°64 - Twitter : what you can and can't say Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°63 : London Olympics security Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°62 - Pinterest : the Wikipedia of search Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°61 - The rise of the e-book : can anyone get published ? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°60 : Financing your studies Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°59 : One in three unemployed people are convicted criminals Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°58 : Should we stop eating meat? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°57 : Teen entrepreneurs Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°56 : Youth unemployment in the UK Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°55 : United Kingdom or Disunited Kingdom ? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°54 : Should teens be allowed to vote ? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°53 : British and American English Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°52 : School uniform Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°51 : Technology addiction Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°50 : A medieval tradition alive today Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°49 : Organ donation Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°48 - Cyber-Bullying : A Modern Problem Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°47 - Internships : are they fair ? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°46 : Do you speak Globish? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°45 : Smart Drugs Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°44 : Where Have All the Law Jobs Gone ?