1. Examens
  2. Tests et examens de langues
  3. Anglais : améliorer son vocabulaire
  4. Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°60 : Financing your studies

Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°60 : Financing your studies

Envoyer cet article à un ami

Enrichir votre vocabulaire d’anglais en quelques clics, ça vous dit ? Avec son partenaire MyCow, letudiant.fr vous propose de (re)découvrir des notions-clés dans de très nombreux thèmes, grâce à la lecture "active" d’articles rédigés par des journalistes anglo-saxons : il vous suffit de passer votre souris sur le mot souligné pour en avoir la traduction ! Et pour améliorer votre prononciation, écoutez le texte lu par un anglophone, en qualité audio mp3.

Résumé en français : financer ses études en travaillant en parallèle devient de plus en plus difficile et toutes les études ne le permettent pas. Mais les étudiants qui y arrivent y acquièrent des compétences qui leur serviront par la suite.

Being a student has never been more expensive. There’s the rent to pay, food and books to buy, not to mention the hope of having some money left over for a social life. As a result, more and more students in France are working alongside their studies. 
 
According to the statistics from the OVE (Observatory of student life), eight in 10 students have – or have had in the past – a paid job. More than 40 percent of students work during the university year. This figure has been growing consistently for the past decade. Students’ spending power is going down; rents and food prices are going up.

But is it always possible to work? That depends on the subject you are studying, the year you are currently in and the job you get. It is often not advised for medical students, especially during the very competitive first year. Students who have a full 25-30 hours of lessons per week plus assignments and reading would most likely struggle to work alongside without their grades suffering. Indeed, various studies have proven that over 15 hours of work per week (on top of studies) can have damaging effects such as less sleep, less exercise and a tendency to smoke and drink more. This can of course lead to worse grades and difficulty in concentrating at university. According to the OVE, this situation concerns around 20 percent of students who work and their exam grades are affected.

However, the same observatory found that there is little impact on studies for those who work fewer than 15 hours per week. For some students, it can even have a positive effect as it can make you more independent and gain valuable work experience.

There are a variety of student jobs on offer – from McDonalds (granted, there are more glamorous jobs, but as the company takes on lots of students, it often makes an effort to fit the hours you work around your classes), to giving private lessons (either through a company or self-employed) or working in a museum, hotel or cafe, depending on your hours at university.

According to the UNEF students’ union, 80 percent of student jobs have no link with studies. This is particularly true for students of literature and social sciences. It’s true that not all jobs will be related to your studies or what you intend to do afterwards. This is not necessarily a bad thing. Most skills such as communication and team work – are transferable. If you’re a languages student, working in any job where you use a foreign language is bound to be beneficial, even if it’s just giving directions to lost tourists!

When it comes to working alongside your studies, a lot depends on the job you get. If you have an understanding employer, he or she might be able to give you more hours during the holidays and fewer when you need to revise or do exams.

There are also alternatives to working during the year. You could work full-time during the summer holidays or other university holidays to save up some money, or even take a year out during your studies in order to work, before coming back to your studies with some cash saved up.

As with everything, the key is balance. What would you gain and what would you lose by working alongside your studies?


By Bex

Écoutez le MP3

Pour améliorer votre prononciation, écoutez ce texte en audio mp3, lu par un anglophone
Aller plus loin

- Étudier dans un lycée américain : comme dans les séries TV ?
- Langues : tous les tests et les examens pour évaluer votre niveau
- Progresser en langues
- Partir étudier à l'étranger
Tout savoir sur le bac 2011
- Booster son niveau en langues
- Tout pour réussir les langues au bac
- Nos quizz d'anglais
- Décrocher un job d’été à l’étranger
- Trouver un job d’été à Londres
- Les offres de jobs à l'étranger
- Les offres de stages à l'étranger
- Portrait : Partir étudier en Angleterre selon Chloé, étudiante en droit à Londres
- Vidéo : Les conseils d'un professeur d'anglais pour réussir vos révisions du bac
À consulter aussi

mycow apprendre anglais43 leçons d'anglais pour enrichir votre vocabulaire

- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°1 : Silent Menace
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°2 : New Eating Disorder
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°3 : London's French Side
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°4 : Berlin's Underground Spirit
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°5 : US Build Killer Robots
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°6 : Recessionary Rock
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°7 : The Origin Of the Word "Spam"
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°8 : Abraham Lincoln – A Great President?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°9 : Face-booked
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°10 : Blog Your Way To A Better Job
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°11 : Bad News For Students
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°12 : Reality TV
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°13 : Expatriates: is the grass really greener on the other side?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°14 : Gap Years
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°15 : “Twitter Is Useless”
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°16 : Flash Mobbing
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°17 : Hungry World
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°18 : Mrs Gao: And The Hidden Truth Of AIDS In China
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°19 : Alcohol, the worst drug ?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°20 : UK And France Call For Anonymous CV’s
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°21 : MBAs – is the class diverse enough ?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°22 : China is in first place to make clean energy
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°23 : Bamboccioni - The Italian Word for a Global Trend
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°24 : How to choose an MBA school...
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°25 : Compensatory Ethics
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°26 : When will I be famous?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°27 : Should Politics Serve The Markets Or Tame Them?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°28 : Lads’ Mags
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°29 : Working for humanitarian organisations
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°30 : Who Wants To Be A Teacher?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°31 : UK, Retirement Age To Rise To 66 Years Old
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°32 : What’s Eating India?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°33 : Historical fiction
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°34 : Why the English need to learn another language
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°35 : The Graduates' Difficulties
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°36 : Fertility tourism
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°37 : A British view of the French education system
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°38 : Nick Leeson - UK’s Jerome Kerviel
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°39 : Student Protest Divides Nation
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°40 : Rapper Jay-Z releases new book
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°41 : The music business - Profit or loss ?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°42 : Where is Haiti now?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°43 : Do we work too much ?

Sommaire du dossier
Retour au dossier Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°64 - Twitter : what you can and can't say Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°63 : London Olympics security Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°62 - Pinterest : the Wikipedia of search Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°61 - The rise of the e-book : can anyone get published ? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°60 : Financing your studies Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°59 : One in three unemployed people are convicted criminals Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°58 : Should we stop eating meat? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°57 : Teen entrepreneurs Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°56 : Youth unemployment in the UK Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°55 : United Kingdom or Disunited Kingdom ? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°54 : Should teens be allowed to vote ? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°53 : British and American English Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°52 : School uniform Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°51 : Technology addiction Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°50 : A medieval tradition alive today Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°49 : Organ donation Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°48 - Cyber-Bullying : A Modern Problem Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°47 - Internships : are they fair ? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°46 : Do you speak Globish? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°45 : Smart Drugs Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°44 : Where Have All the Law Jobs Gone ?