1. Examens
  2. Tests et examens de langues
  3. Anglais : améliorer son vocabulaire
  4. Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°64 - Twitter : what you can and can't say

Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°64 - Twitter : what you can and can't say

Envoyer cet article à un ami

Enrichir votre vocabulaire d’anglais en quelques clics, ça vous dit ? Avec son partenaire MyCow, letudiant.fr vous propose de (re)découvrir des notions-clés dans de très nombreux thèmes, grâce à la lecture "active" d’articles rédigés par des journalistes anglo-saxons : il vous suffit de passer votre souris sur le mot souligné pour en avoir la traduction ! Et pour améliorer votre prononciation, écoutez le texte lu par un anglophone, en qualité audio mp3.

Résumé en français : s'exprimer sur internet, c'est bien, mesurer ses propos, c'est mieux.


Twitter users have been sent to prison because of comments they have written. Experts say that most people do not realise the consequences of what they write online.

‘There was a survey conducted by one of the big global law firms at the end of last year, it found that 65% of respondents, and they were mainly young people, had no idea of the legal consequences of going online,’ Professor Duncan Bloy, a media law expert at Cardiff University’s School of Journalism, told the press.

So what can and can’t you say?

Messages that are abusive, menacing or libellous could land you in prison. There have been many convictions of football fans recently. Student Liam Stacey sent racially abusive ‘tweets’ when footballer Fabrice Muamba collapsed. The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) said it hoped that Stacey’s prison sentence would serve as a warning for others.

Two people were jailed for their comments on social networking sites during the riots in England last summer. Jordan Blackshaw, 21, was jailed for four years because he encouraged rioting when he set up a Facebook event inviting people to ‘smash’ Norwich town. Lawyers say that the long sentence was due to the fact that there was potential for serious harm and injury.

One man was recently convicted for a menacing message. Paul Chambers, 27, from Doncaster in the north of England, wrote this tweet: ‘Robin Hood Airport is closed. You’ve got a week and a bit...otherwise I’m blowing the airport sky high!’ He was fined £385 and ordered to pay £600 in costs. Comedian Stephen Fry argued that Chambers’ tweet was an example of British humour. A benefit gig was held in London to try and raise funds for his appeal. Supporters thought Chambers had done something stupid, but not criminal. But the courts disagreed.

And if you’ve committed one of these crimes, the evidence is there for all to see. Wendy Williams, head of the CPS in the North East of England, told the press: ‘Ironically, the strongest evidence in each of these cases has been directly provided by the defendants themselves. When a person makes such comments digitally, they effectively hand police and prosecutors much of the evidence needed to build a robust case against them.’

Lawyers say that many social network users do not think of the consequences of their actions. Posting a comment online is not the same as joking among friends. Experts say the question to ask yourself is whether you would be prepared to shout out the message in a crowded room. If you’re in doubt, then don’t post it. Julian Young, a solicitor advocate, told the press: ‘There needs to be a message to think before you post something online.’ He suggests that sites such as Facebook, Bebo and Twitter should have a warning about criminal offences.

If you have a Facebook or Twitter account, make sure you think about what you write before you write it – the consequences can be huge.
 

By Bex
 

Écoutez le MP3

Pour améliorer votre prononciation, écoutez ce texte en audio mp3, lu par un anglophone
Aller plus loin

- Étudier dans un lycée américain : comme dans les séries TV ?
- Langues : tous les tests et les examens pour évaluer votre niveau
- Progresser en langues
- Partir étudier à l'étranger
Tout savoir sur le bac 2011
- Booster son niveau en langues
- Tout pour réussir les langues au bac
- Nos quizz d'anglais
- Décrocher un job d’été à l’étranger
- Trouver un job d’été à Londres
- Les offres de jobs à l'étranger
- Les offres de stages à l'étranger
- Portrait : Partir étudier en Angleterre selon Chloé, étudiante en droit à Londres
- Vidéo : Les conseils d'un professeur d'anglais pour réussir vos révisions du bac
À consulter aussi

mycow apprendre anglais43 leçons d'anglais pour enrichir votre vocabulaire

- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°1 : Silent Menace
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°2 : New Eating Disorder
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°3 : London's French Side
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°4 : Berlin's Underground Spirit
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°5 : US Build Killer Robots
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°6 : Recessionary Rock
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°7 : The Origin Of the Word "Spam"
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°8 : Abraham Lincoln – A Great President?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°9 : Face-booked
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°10 : Blog Your Way To A Better Job
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°11 : Bad News For Students
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°12 : Reality TV
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°13 : Expatriates: is the grass really greener on the other side?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°14 : Gap Years
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°15 : “Twitter Is Useless”
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°16 : Flash Mobbing
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°17 : Hungry World
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°18 : Mrs Gao: And The Hidden Truth Of AIDS In China
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°19 : Alcohol, the worst drug ?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°20 : UK And France Call For Anonymous CV’s
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°21 : MBAs – is the class diverse enough ?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°22 : China is in first place to make clean energy
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°23 : Bamboccioni - The Italian Word for a Global Trend
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°24 : How to choose an MBA school...
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°25 : Compensatory Ethics
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°26 : When will I be famous?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°27 : Should Politics Serve The Markets Or Tame Them?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°28 : Lads’ Mags
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°29 : Working for humanitarian organisations
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°30 : Who Wants To Be A Teacher?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°31 : UK, Retirement Age To Rise To 66 Years Old
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°32 : What’s Eating India?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°33 : Historical fiction
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°34 : Why the English need to learn another language
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°35 : The Graduates' Difficulties
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°36 : Fertility tourism
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°37 : A British view of the French education system
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°38 : Nick Leeson - UK’s Jerome Kerviel
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°39 : Student Protest Divides Nation
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°40 : Rapper Jay-Z releases new book
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°41 : The music business - Profit or loss ?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°42 : Where is Haiti now?
- Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°43 : Do we work too much ?

 

 

Sommaire du dossier
Retour au dossier Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°64 - Twitter : what you can and can't say Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°63 : London Olympics security Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°62 - Pinterest : the Wikipedia of search Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°61 - The rise of the e-book : can anyone get published ? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°60 : Financing your studies Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°59 : One in three unemployed people are convicted criminals Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°58 : Should we stop eating meat? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°57 : Teen entrepreneurs Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°56 : Youth unemployment in the UK Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°55 : United Kingdom or Disunited Kingdom ? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°54 : Should teens be allowed to vote ? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°53 : British and American English Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°52 : School uniform Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°51 : Technology addiction Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°50 : A medieval tradition alive today Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°49 : Organ donation Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°48 - Cyber-Bullying : A Modern Problem Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°47 - Internships : are they fair ? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°46 : Do you speak Globish? Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°45 : Smart Drugs Vocabulaire d'anglais, leçon n°44 : Where Have All the Law Jobs Gone ?